How to avoid “the money pit” when purchasing a church facility

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A litany of items must be explored and navigated by any church looking to acquire another facility. Be careful to not get too excited about the “deal” that you do not perform adequate due diligence. The time, energy and/or money invested will be worth every dime and minute.

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The difference between a “can do” church and a “can’t do” church

Every church also faces obstacles. What is the difference between churches that approach obstacles with a “can do” attitude over others that have a “can’t do” attitude? What makes a church have a lively optimism over a dead pessimism?

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3 shades of leadership grey

There are 2 types of people in the world — rule-breakers and rule-keepers. I admit that I am a rule-keeper. There, I said it. As such, you might think that I am a black-and-white type of guy. The reality is that I’m not all that much. Here are 3 reasons why.

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5 mistakes churches make with their online giving

KentWoodyard

Whichever end of the spectrum your church falls on — big, small, urban, rural, tech-savvy or still improving — I’m sure there are things about your church’s online presence that sometimes make you cringe. With that in mind, I’d like to talk about the five most “cringe-worthy” mistakes I see churches make with their digital giving strategies. My intention here is not to “throw stones,” but rather to shine a light on some of the low-hanging fruit in the oft-confusing and ever-changing world of digital giving.

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Consistent is better than extraordinary

If I asked you to tell me about your 2014, you’d likely tell me about the highlights — vacations you took, job changes, big things in the lives of your kids, and other things that stand out in your mind. But, that’s not what made the biggest difference in your life in 2014. Here’s what actually made the biggest difference: You ate. You slept. You drank water. That’s why you’re alive. That’s what sustained you and allowed all of the other things to happen. When any of those slipped, so did the rest of life. Try to enjoy your vacation without food, drink or sleep. Try to have breakthroughs at work or be a sunshiny presence at home. Eat, drink, sleep. Do those three things well and the rest of life happens. Fail to do them and life is worse — or life ends.

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4 kinds of conflict-resolving people

Whether toddlers or 20-year employees, the reality is that conflict is inevitable. It’s not if, but how, you deal with it that defines you. There are four kinds of conflict-resolving people: The Wimp, The Driver, The Accommodator and The Winner.

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Hurry not

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Being hurried through the day is in deep contrast to the example of Jesus, who never seemed to be in a hurry. Jesus not only refused to be hurried, but prayer and solitude was a regular part of his daily routine. Jesus told his disciples, ‘Come with me by yourselves to a quiet place and get some rest.’ So they went away by themselves in a boat to a solitary place” (Mark 6:31-32). This practice of solitude was a practice of many in the early church. Not only did monks and hermits practice solitude, but the Rules of St. Benedict of prayer, work, study, hospitality and renewal were embraced by both clergy and the common people.

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Pastor, you’re a statesman, too

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I use the term “statesman” not in a truly political sense, though I do believe pastors should be the most active “ambassadors” for Christ in their churches. Pastors are statesmen in that they must realize they always represent their churches. That hat never comes off.

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So you want to be a great boss? 4 tips

EricRojas

Here are 4 keys to being the best boss you can be. These keys apply to parents and coaches, as well.

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How not to be a leadership fad

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In the church, what works to grow a church today may not work in the future. You can be a popular leader, only to lose that popularity more quickly than Vanilla Ice dropped out of the mainstream.

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