An introduction to church facility stewardship

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I’m a firm believer that everything on earth belongs to God. Our money. Our houses. Our cars. The word of God. Our families. The people we encounter — and the facilities in which we worship. God has entrusted us with the stewarding of all these items.

For me, stewardship is less about what we give and more about taking care of what we have been given — of all that’s entrusted to us.

So, how do we define “entrusted”?

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PASTOR-FRIENDLY VIDEO — Case study: Saddleback Church

Band leading worship, hands raised everywhere in the formerly Fuel crowd.

Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, CA, hosts more than 20,000 people in weekly attendance. Throughout the week, this globally recognized church offers five services and a number of different events, including concerts, workshops and other studies and seminars. The church was looking to upgrade its facility as part of its “Decade of Destiny” campaign — a 10-year vision to help members in the areas of physical, financial, relational, emotional, mental, vocational and spiritual health.

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Understanding loudspeaker systems — what’s right for your church?

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Though your church’s audio system is comprised of a lot of different components, loudspeakers are arguably the most significant. As the final link between the message and the listener, the right loudspeaker system can make the difference between indifference and inspiration.

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Effective student spaces: 3 tried-and-true design elements

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Many student worship spaces use design elements that promote ministry and embody many of the same elements we find in all worship spaces. However, student worship spaces typically take it to a different level. While the ultimate goal is to worship Jesus, there’s also a practical goal: to maintain a connection with the student, who’s bombarded with all the trappings of today’s culture and crowd. To be successful on both fronts, the architecture and the design of the space must uniquely “speak” to the student population.

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All things to all people: examining non-traditional worship venues

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As we present Part 3 of this seven-part series, we should remind ourselves of a primary concept: Every church is different. With this particular article, that’s especially true. In fact, the non-traditional worship space can be almost anything.

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New eBook examines — in-depth — the “heart” of church design: the worship space

Download the "Designing Worship Areas" eBook!

Every church is different. Even so, one thing they all have in common is the desire to create a space that evokes and contributes to a person’s worship experience. In this in-depth new eBook, “Designing Worship Spaces” series author Curtiss H. Doss, AIA — who has designed for church clients for more than two decades — talks about the unique DNA of each church, and why it must be honored in the church’s worship space design.

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Is your church campus truly engaging? A new eBook breaks it down

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For a church campus design to be effective, it must be engaging — beginning the moment someone walks through the door. In this new eBook, co-authors Allison Parrott and Paul Lodholz of Ziegler Cooper Architects discuss the importance of designing an engaging first impression: the church lobby, as well as 3 design musts for engaging sanctuary design.

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Engaging sanctuaries: 3 design “musts”

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Depending on the culture and style of your congregation, your sanctuary might look more traditional or more modern — there are many ways to express the beauty of Christian worship. Despite these differences, however, there are some common design elements that are useful in creating an engaging sanctuary, no matter what your worship style might be.

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Worship takes shape: examining traditional sanctuary design

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As Part 2 of this “Designing Worship Areas” series begins, let’s reiterate a primary concept from
Part 1: Every church is different. Having restated that precept, let’s now look at the traditional worship space and the elements through which it contributes to a person’s worship experience.

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Making sound (system) decisions

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What defines good sound? While some might argue that the concept is subjective, there are certain aspects of a good sound system that we can all agree on. Spoken word should be intelligible. Musical performance should be clear and full-range. And sound should be consistent, everywhere in the house.
Of course, addressing these goals will vary widely from one church to another. Are you welcoming your flock in a 1,000-seat sanctuary? Clearly, your needs will differ from a congregation meeting in a 300-seat chapel, an auditorium, or a converted warehouse space.

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