When a church MOVES, will its people FOLLOW?

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Churches relocate more than you think. In fact, your own church might be moving. Or, maybe you’re wondering how to relocate successfully sometime in the future. In either scenario, you’ll face some primary challenges:
• Communicating the church move to your members and regular attendees
(the congregation)
• Communicating the church move to your neighbors (the community)

That’s why you need a communications strategy before you make the move.

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Religious institution financing truths—regardless of the lending climate

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As the business administrator of a religious institution, you don’t need to be an experienced commercial developer to get a construction loan — you just need an expert ministry bank.

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Effective student spaces: 3 tried-and-true design elements

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Many student worship spaces use design elements that promote ministry and embody many of the same elements we find in all worship spaces. However, student worship spaces typically take it to a different level. While the ultimate goal is to worship Jesus, there’s also a practical goal: to maintain a connection with the student, who’s bombarded with all the trappings of today’s culture and crowd. To be successful on both fronts, the architecture and the design of the space must uniquely “speak” to the student population.

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Using ChMS tools to engage visitors: 5 steps

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Engaging first-time visitors is crucial to church growth. Most church growth studies find that:

• Out of 100 visitors, typically 10 to 25 will return for a second visit
• About 50 percent of those second-timers will return for a third service
• Of those, 75 percent will make a fourth visit
• After going four times, churches can generally begin to call those people regular attenders.

But, how can churches ensure they’re connecting with visitors so they’ll want to return for that next visit?

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Engagement leads to building disciples

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Making connections is an important part of life. From faster, more effective communication to building a more engaged community through deeper relationships, the promise of connecting through the use of technology in the 21st century seems awesome. While technology itself is not the answer, it can be utilized by churches to better connect, engage, equip and mobilize their congregations for doing the work outlined through the Gospel.

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Proof that adding mobile giving won’t increase your church’s budget

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A few months ago, I sat down for coffee with a young executive pastor. He was technologically savvy, ambitious and full of positivity as his church had seen triple-digit growth in the last few years.

As soon as the topic of church software came up, his countenance changed.

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Invisible technology, tangible fellowship

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Too often, we talk about tracking visitors and not letting them “fall through the cracks” of the organization. That’s the foundation of what a church management system (ChMS) should do — but it can be lot richer.

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Hail Mary or holy moly: there’s got to be a better way to fund ministry

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Many church leaders have realized that data and technology provide new ways of thinking about how they can overcome their increasing financial challenges.

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Church executives find quality, convenience in online education programs

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When Barrington Goldson founded Calvary Tabernacle in Hempstead, NY, nearly 25 years ago, there were 19 congregants worshipping in a motel room. Now, Calvary hosts nearly 800 members in a 12,000-square-foot building every Sunday and supports two K-8 charter schools and 27 churches in five countries.

Getting from Point A to Point B required Goldson to further his education. So, in 2011, he enrolled in an online MBA degree program at Phoenix-based Grand Canyon University to learn to meet the demands of his growing church.

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Busy church leader? 5 tips for choosing a distance-based seminary program

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By John Dyer “HOW CAN I GET THE DEPTH I NEED WITHOUT LEAVING THE PEOPLE I LOVE?” This was the question Cynthia Johnson, an energetic woman in her late 40s, asked me recently at a coffee shop in Nashville. She had a job she loved — running a battered women’s shelter nearby — but she […]

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