3 leadership practices every young minister can do right now

Blog-359_Atari

I recently had coffee with a young(er) minister. He asked a great question: What can I do right now? The young minister (he’s around 20) wanted to know how he could lead better. Starting today. He caught me a bit off guard. After all, leadership is learned and refined over time. Pastors spend years growing. He knew that, but he also wanted to know what could be done immediately.

I’m not that far removed from being a “young” pastor (at 35, many might still categorize me in this way), but I have learned — some things the hard way — from pastoring for 10 years. There are a few practices young ministers can do right now that will help them grow immediately. Here are three leadership practices I shared with him.

Share

Social media risk — a spot check for the church?

SAFETY STRATS ART

Recently, I convened a panel of experts for a conversation about where the Church stands relative to capitalizing on the remarkable evangelization opportunity of social media. The key questions:
• Are churches actually embracing
social media?
• If so, how are they doing managing the risks?
• How can churches establish boundaries as they row in these unchartered waters?

Share

When a church MOVES, will its people FOLLOW?

WOL-135

Churches relocate more than you think. In fact, your own church might be moving. Or, maybe you’re wondering how to relocate successfully sometime in the future. In either scenario, you’ll face some primary challenges:
• Communicating the church move to your members and regular attendees
(the congregation)
• Communicating the church move to your neighbors (the community)

That’s why you need a communications strategy before you make the move.

Share

Using ChMS tools to engage visitors: 5 steps

ChMS_2

Engaging first-time visitors is crucial to church growth. Most church growth studies find that:

• Out of 100 visitors, typically 10 to 25 will return for a second visit
• About 50 percent of those second-timers will return for a third service
• Of those, 75 percent will make a fourth visit
• After going four times, churches can generally begin to call those people regular attenders.

But, how can churches ensure they’re connecting with visitors so they’ll want to return for that next visit?

Share

Engagement leads to building disciples

ThinkstockPhotos-78317167

Making connections is an important part of life. From faster, more effective communication to building a more engaged community through deeper relationships, the promise of connecting through the use of technology in the 21st century seems awesome. While technology itself is not the answer, it can be utilized by churches to better connect, engage, equip and mobilize their congregations for doing the work outlined through the Gospel.

Share

Invisible technology, tangible fellowship

ChMS_2

Too often, we talk about tracking visitors and not letting them “fall through the cracks” of the organization. That’s the foundation of what a church management system (ChMS) should do — but it can be lot richer.

Share

Hail Mary or holy moly: there’s got to be a better way to fund ministry

head

Many church leaders have realized that data and technology provide new ways of thinking about how they can overcome their increasing financial challenges.

Share

THE CE INTERVIEW: Mark Mellen

MAIN SPREAD

Mark Mellen was 26 years old and a homeless drug addict when God called him out of misery into a life of purpose. After finishing college with a degree in finance, he went to Bethel Seminary and graduated with a master’s of arts in theological studies.

The best learnings, however, came from ministry experiences and mentorship from church leaders who, Mellen says, “took a shot on me.”

Share

Settling the annual review debate

In HR and management circles, there is a raging debate over whether or not to do annual reviews.

staffmanagementAll of Christ Community Church’s 120-plus employees are currently at the end of our fiscal year annual review season. Between now and June 30, each employee will receive a year-end review that takes place once a year at this time. It is a very systematic and organized process.

So, you can guess from our process that I am a believer in annual reviews. Well, I am — but you might be surprised at my answer to the annual review debate. Should an organization, business or church conduct annual reviews?

My answer is a resounding “maybe”. Let me explain.

Share

The difference between commentary and leadership

Both commentary and leadership are needed. Sometimes they overlap — a commentator may also be a leader. But here is how they are different.

Share