Multisite & portable churches: essential equipment considerations

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Choosing equipment for a portable church is significantly different than choosing equipment for a permanent church building. Churches that don’t acknowledge this will likely make things much harder for volunteers and experience more breakage, require far more storage, and end up spending more money in the long run.

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Alternative facility options — spotlight on: happy campers!

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For an 18,000-square-foot worship center for the new Oklahoma Assembly of God State Youth Camp in Sparks, OK, a metal building system made the most sense. Here’s why.

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Do you really need to build? When divvying up your existing space makes more sense

Canaan Baptist Church in St. Louis, MO, needed 20 Sunday school classrooms. Portable room dividers delivered the outcome the church wanted, at a fraction of the cost of traditional construction.

As your church finds itself in need of more ministry space, a new building might seem like a logical solution. But, in the interest of stewardship, it pays to consider whether or not an existing space can be reimagined instead.

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Multisite & portable churches: create the team & establish the process

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Your volunteer vision, strategy, attitude and approach to launching portable churches and campuses will greatly impact the success, discipleship, spiritual formation, community impact and long-term growth of your church.

You’re going to begin life in a rented, secular space like a school, theater or community center. So, is your glass half full or half empty?

Your attitude and approach do matter!

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Financing your church bus fleet: common questions

This is a new 2016 Ford Starcraft 14-passenger + driver bus priced below $60,000. View details at: midwesttransit.com/auto/new-2016-ford-starcraft-kankakee-60901-il/4654987.

When it comes to buying a church bus, the first question is always: Buy or lease?

Obviously, a church needs to assess its needs and weigh the costs of buying or leasing a bus and what works best for its congregation. But I will say this: Buying a bus outright has its drawbacks, because a large amount of money is taken out of operating expenses. As such, leasing has become a much more popular option in recent years among many churches because it frees up money for ministry!

Here are 10 reasons why a lease might work best for your church.

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New Year’s resolution — plant a church!

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Perhaps you’ve heard the often-told adage that 80 percent of all new church plants fail. Not true. While there’s no comprehensive research on the total number of new churches started annually, the most recent research on literally thousands of new church starts show that 99 percent of all new churches survive the first year, and 68 percent survive to year four. Moreover, of the churches that survive, more than 70 percent are self-sufficient financially by the fifth year.

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Pastor uses Internet to launch multiple churches across the country simultaneously in time for Christmas

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With more than 3 billion people using the Internet by 2015, the trend of people relying on the Internet to connect with each other is showing no signs of slowing down — and that’s just fine with Jimmie Davidson.

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Engaging Spaces: Entry & Wayfinding

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Visiting a church for the first time can be quite daunting. Often, long-time church members take for granted that visitors “just know” which areas to park in, where the easiest entrance is located, and how to navigate the church campus.

But, for a first-time visitor, a church campus without clear wayfinding elements can be difficult to navigate — and make it less likely they’ll return.

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What quality church live streaming looks like

With the advent of live streaming and A/V communication, we are at the forefront of a media revolution.

Make sure your church is ahead of the curve.

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Church Transportation: Long-term maintenance considerations

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If you’re in the market for a church bus, you really need to think about what happens “down the road” — i.e., in terms of maintenance.

Here are six questions you should ask before you buy, and some expert advice.

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