New eBook: How to keep your people safe — even when they’re far away

safetystrategiesebookcover

In a smaller, more technological world, church leaders can’t afford to underestimate proactive, collaborative safety and risk management strategies. To that end, in this informative new eBook, Peter A. Persuitti, managing director, Religious Practice, at Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., talks about how to proactively protect church staff and volunteers doing missionary work in third-world countries.

Share

Safety Strategies: Clear your path to a safe church

SAFETY ICON

The aisles that guide your congregation to a higher power could lead to slips, trips and falls if you’re not careful. Falls are one of the leading causes of unintentional injuries in the U.S., according to the National Safety Council. Those injuries accounted for about 8.8 million visits to the emergency room in 2013 — a nearly 500,000 drop from about 9.3 million visits to the emergency room in 2011.

Share

Expanding abuse reporting requirements: Texas, South Carolina, Colorado and National Trends

abuse

Legislative changes to child abuse reporting statutes can significantly impact daily operations of these organizations. Leadership must stay abreast of statutory changes in abuse reporting requirements.

Share

Preventing arson: Is your church vulnerable?

Insurance-covered

According to the U.S. Fire Administration (USFA), arson is the leading cause of fires in the United States, resulting in more than $1 billion in property loss each year. USFA recently reported that approximately 30,500 intentional structural fires occurred over the last year. By nature, places of worship are often easy targets for arsonists. Here’s how to protect your church.

Share

Board duty is serious business!

“It is paramount to understand that even when the Church agrees to indemnify directors of boards to the maximum extent allowed by law, directors remain personally liable for their actions that breach board duties.”

People of faith are frequently mission-driven and ministerially oriented. For many of these, volunteering is often considered more privilege than obligation. When such folks have managerial or leadership experience, or when they possess special expertise or have received professional education and training, it is not uncommon that they volunteer to serve the Church via board membership and activity. It is critically important to recognize, however, that even highly educated, skilled and experienced people do not necessarily understand what board service entails and requires of them.

Share

Protecting international ministry members from Ebola

As a provider of international evacuation for its clients — including many churches — Arthur J. Gallagher fields Ebola questions quite a bit, especially in recent months. Here’s what you (and your ministry teams) need to know.

Share

Beware of inadequate limits of insurance

insurance-coverage copy

Insuring for less than full value is a common problem among churches. By “value,” I mean the replacement cost of a building, not the depreciated actual cash value or the market value. Underinsurance is common for several reasons.

Share

Safety Strategies: The vast frontier — and associated risks

Safety Strategies logo

In a smaller, more technological world, we can’t afford to underestimate proactive, collaborative safety and risk management strategies. The Ebola crisis has all of us thinking differently, for the time being. Unfortunately, our sensitizing is hard to sustain with so much information hitting our radar screens.

Share

Fires and substantial loss: how to ensure you’re insured

CE NOV-DEC MAG 2014_44

Every day, five churches are damaged by fire in the United States. At that rate, a church in your state would catch fire every 10 days! It happened 1,800 times last year, causing more than $98 million in damages to religious properties.
When was the last time you and your senior staff sat down and considered a contingency plan for a fire which seriously damages your church?

Share

Never Again: The Little Things Really Do Count

NEVER AGAIN

When it comes to risk management, a few extra steps — literally — can prevent a tragedy.

Share