Church Growth Archives - Church Executive


Facility repurposing: financial pros & cons

Abandoned factory foundation renovation with parking spaces. Horizontal.

 By Kari Boyce Whether you’re a new church looking for a first home, a growing congregation needing a larger space to worship, or searching for a space for your exploding youth group to meet, there’s no denying one major trend for churches: facility repurposing. Churches across the country are taking advantage of vacant space that […]

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Understanding metrics that quantify leveraged assets

By Rebecca M. DaVee, CPA In 1856, 16 individuals formed First Presbyterian Church of Dallas. For 15 years, the congregation met in various locations, including the Dallas County Courthouse. Fast forward to 1872 — the Dallas Presbyterians had found a new church home, located on Elm and Ervay. With the arrival of the railroads, downtown […]

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3 things “churches in the shadows” can learn from megachurches

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Not every small church in the country is destined to become a megachurch, nor should it be. Nearly 90% of all churchgoers attend much smaller churches and obviously enjoy the size, fellowship and ministry they find there. Even so, here are some things we can learn from the megachurches, and which are likely to contribute to continued health and vitality, if not attendance growth.

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Why your report writer is no longer good enough

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Report-writing tools were supposed to help solve these challenges, but it’s evident that those are limited in their application. As a result, church leaders feel like they’re swimming in a sea of information, but still thirsty for insight. Where do these new report-writing tools fall short? More importantly, is there a better way to analyze the information you have to finally start gaining traction towards your ultimate vision? Those are the two questions we’re working together to help church leaders answer.

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New Year’s resolution — plant a church!

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Perhaps you’ve heard the often-told adage that 80 percent of all new church plants fail. Not true. While there’s no comprehensive research on the total number of new churches started annually, the most recent research on literally thousands of new church starts show that 99 percent of all new churches survive the first year, and 68 percent survive to year four. Moreover, of the churches that survive, more than 70 percent are self-sufficient financially by the fifth year.

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Pastor uses Internet to launch multiple churches across the country simultaneously in time for Christmas

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With more than 3 billion people using the Internet by 2015, the trend of people relying on the Internet to connect with each other is showing no signs of slowing down — and that’s just fine with Jimmie Davidson.

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2 unseen benefits of being an established church

The “established” side of the established church is often viewed with some derision. I certainly understand why.The establishment can be stodgy, stuck and stuffy. Being established, however, is what you make it.

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Healthy church members: how they help create (and grow) healthy churches

Just as every pastor should be concerned about church health, every true believer should be interested as well in how to be a “healthy church member.” As we focused on the local church in the last blog, I thought I would address the topic as well from a local church perspective.

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Multi-tribal

A few months ago, I was having a dialogue with Rich Birch of Liquid Church (and unSeminary) about one of his blogs: Is “Multisite Church” the Last Good Idea?

Rich asked me to add some commentary to his post, as we have shared in collaborating on other subject matter related to multisite church, including Birch’s contribution to Church Locality. The premise of the blog was whether or not multisite was the last good idea for church growth and multiplication, which spawned a lot of good conversations.

My comment to the blog supported multisite as a great tool for church multiplication, but I had a slightly different take. Here was my response.

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Why the generation gap is larger now more than ever

Many cultural changes affect generation gaps. For instance, my father’s choice of 1960’s rock is quite different than my preference of 1990’s rock. And we all know music style can be a contentious issue in the Church.

Technology, however, is often cited as the main wedge between generations in the U.S. culture.

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