church staff management Archives - Church Executive


Background check red flags: what to watch for, what they indicate — and what to do if they arise

Ministries need to be aware that even the best applicant on paper might not seem so squeaky clean after a background check. It’s important that church leaders have a standardized policy when it comes to identifying “red flags” that will disqualify someone from employment or volunteer positions. Even red flags such as behavior or character traits need to be thoughtfully weighed as they could expose the church to increased risk.

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Payroll: Do you have your ducks in a row?

One definition of “dread” is managing payroll without qualified staff. For those churches with limited resources, ministerial staffing positions must be filled first. A common sentiment among pastoral leadership regarding payroll is, How hard can it be?

Well, it is hard. And, some mistakes could lead to serious consequences.

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How to increase staff participation in your retirement plan

A new employee has fulfilled their probationary period and is now eligible to receive the full benefits offered by your organization. Yet, many eligible employees choose not to contribute to their retirement — even if it means leaving matching employer contributions on the table.

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The #1 key to a great church hire

There are many very important aspects to making a good hire. They include a good job posting, posting to the right places, reference calls, résumé review, the interview process, crafting the right job description, prayer, more prayer, and many more. However, one key stands out above the others. What is it? It’s your gut.

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Listening when you can’t possibly hear everyone

If you’re like me, you want your voice heard — even at the top levels of leadership. I may not be able to have lunch with the President of the United States, but I do want to feel like he’s listening to me. I don’t believe it’s an unreasonable expectation of followers to want their voices heard by top leaders.

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Don’t say it! 4 phrases church leaders really need to get rid of

Do you have the disease that’s going around offices, schools and teams these days? It’s really contagious and can be disastrous. It’s called “foot-in-mouth disease.”

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Think you don’t need disability insurance? Think again

States require us to purchase auto insurance. Banks make certain we have mortgage insurance. Parents with children buy life insurance to protect their families in case of an unexpected death.

Yet, despite the fact that research shows we are much more likely to become disabled for more than three months than die in any given year, many of us do not have disability insurance.

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Succession planning: Is your church ready?

Succession planning is the process of developing high-potential employees who have the ability to play leadership roles within your organization. It involves careful evaluation of staff capabilities and development of a process that includes training, mentoring and skill development.

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Using 360-degree evaluations for improved performance

In work or professional settings, the best feedback is face-to-face. However, I have found it is very difficult and utopian to expect that everyone will act this way. As a result, we have implemented the use of 360 feedback as a part of our annual reviews and, on occasion, as a part of time-sensitive feedback needs.

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Settling the annual review debate

In HR and management circles, there is a raging debate over whether or not to do annual reviews.

staffmanagementAll of Christ Community Church’s 120-plus employees are currently at the end of our fiscal year annual review season. Between now and June 30, each employee will receive a year-end review that takes place once a year at this time. It is a very systematic and organized process.

So, you can guess from our process that I am a believer in annual reviews. Well, I am — but you might be surprised at my answer to the annual review debate. Should an organization, business or church conduct annual reviews?

My answer is a resounding “maybe”. Let me explain.

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