4 leadership lessons from March Madness

3.16.15-4-Leadership-Lessons-from-March-Madness

It’s here — the bracket of glory, or the bracket of destruction. While we’re watching the games and reviewing our brackets, there are a few leadership lessons to learn from all the madness.

Share

Can you hear me now? 6 communication lessons learned

Listening-e1416054369560

“Listening” online can be similar and yet very different from audible conversations. For years, we have been told that we need to listen twice as much as we talk since God gave us two ears and only one mouth. I have trained many consultants in the art of listening with their ears and eyes. Non-verbal communication is generally an even more telling indicator of emotion. That is why face-to-face communication is generally more productive than any other kind.

Share

The top 5 traits of absurdly great leaders

EricRojas

If you feel you’re missing the mark, you’re not alone. If you feel like you’re just an absurd leader instead of an absurdly great leader, you’re not alone. These are high marks. However, if you make these your top priorities in leadership, you will find that you will soon be the best of the best in leadership. You will discover that you are an absurdly great leader in the season ahead.

Share

Financial planning for clergy and church administrators: upcoming webinars

retirement2

The statistics on Americans and retirement planning are staggering. More than half of us do not know how much we will need to live a comfortable retirement, and 60 percent have saved less than $25,000. For clergy, the economics of retirement can be even more challenging.

Share

The difference between a “can do” church and a “can’t do” church

Every church also faces obstacles. What is the difference between churches that approach obstacles with a “can do” attitude over others that have a “can’t do” attitude? What makes a church have a lively optimism over a dead pessimism?

Share

3 shades of leadership grey

There are 2 types of people in the world — rule-breakers and rule-keepers. I admit that I am a rule-keeper. There, I said it. As such, you might think that I am a black-and-white type of guy. The reality is that I’m not all that much. Here are 3 reasons why.

Share

New eBook spotlights finances & administration — especially for church leaders

FinancesAdministrationChurchLeaders

In a valuable new eBook, “Finances & Administration for Church Leaders” Rev. Dr. Sara Day, CFP®, examines the value of a pastoral relations committee — among the most effective methods for strengthening the lines of communication between the pastor and the congregation.

Share

4 kinds of conflict-resolving people

Whether toddlers or 20-year employees, the reality is that conflict is inevitable. It’s not if, but how, you deal with it that defines you. There are four kinds of conflict-resolving people: The Wimp, The Driver, The Accommodator and The Winner.

Share

Pastor, you’re a statesman, too

Blog-351_Fishbowl

I use the term “statesman” not in a truly political sense, though I do believe pastors should be the most active “ambassadors” for Christ in their churches. Pastors are statesmen in that they must realize they always represent their churches. That hat never comes off.

Share

The value of a pastoral relations committee

pastoral-committee

For many of us, the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays are a time when we give ourselves permission to overindulge in rich dishes and irresistible desserts. January brings the time to take stock of all that feasting and make a resolution to lose weight and get in shape.
Churches can also benefit from the opportunity that the New Year provides to re-think priorities. One issue to consider is how to improve communication between the pastor and the congregation. Among the most effective methods for strengthening the lines of communication is the formation of a Pastoral Relations Committee.

Share