Engagement leads to building disciples

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Making connections is an important part of life. From faster, more effective communication to building a more engaged community through deeper relationships, the promise of connecting through the use of technology in the 21st century seems awesome. While technology itself is not the answer, it can be utilized by churches to better connect, engage, equip and mobilize their congregations for doing the work outlined through the Gospel.

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Proof that adding mobile giving won’t increase your church’s budget

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A few months ago, I sat down for coffee with a young executive pastor. He was technologically savvy, ambitious and full of positivity as his church had seen triple-digit growth in the last few years.

As soon as the topic of church software came up, his countenance changed.

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Invisible technology, tangible fellowship

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Too often, we talk about tracking visitors and not letting them “fall through the cracks” of the organization. That’s the foundation of what a church management system (ChMS) should do — but it can be lot richer.

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Hail Mary or holy moly: there’s got to be a better way to fund ministry

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Many church leaders have realized that data and technology provide new ways of thinking about how they can overcome their increasing financial challenges.

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Church audits: know the 4 V’s

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Depending on your role at the church, you’ll hear the word “audit” and come to one of two conclusions:

If you’re the finance manager, you understand the need for the substantiation of the integrity of the data — even though an audit can add to your already busy workload.

If you’re the pastor, it comes down to one word: “Why?” The financials are written in what appears to be a foreign language, and they don’t seem to help as you try to make good, mission-critical decisions, anyway.

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Church executives find quality, convenience in online education programs

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When Barrington Goldson founded Calvary Tabernacle in Hempstead, NY, nearly 25 years ago, there were 19 congregants worshipping in a motel room. Now, Calvary hosts nearly 800 members in a 12,000-square-foot building every Sunday and supports two K-8 charter schools and 27 churches in five countries.

Getting from Point A to Point B required Goldson to further his education. So, in 2011, he enrolled in an online MBA degree program at Phoenix-based Grand Canyon University to learn to meet the demands of his growing church.

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Busy church leader? 5 tips for choosing a distance-based seminary program

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By John Dyer “HOW CAN I GET THE DEPTH I NEED WITHOUT LEAVING THE PEOPLE I LOVE?” This was the question Cynthia Johnson, an energetic woman in her late 40s, asked me recently at a coffee shop in Nashville. She had a job she loved — running a battered women’s shelter nearby — but she […]

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Who has time for online continuing education? (Surprise! It’s not who you think.)

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By Shawn Hussey, Ph.D. “WHO HAS TIME FOR THIS?” It’s the frequent cry of anyone considering furthering his or her education. Today, there’s little doubt we’re being asked to do more and more with less and less time. Many of us operate in a state of perpetual time poverty, which makes fitting in a 45-minute […]

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Negotiating compensation without emotion

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It’s a rare person who doesn’t feel like they’re navigating rocky terrain when negotiating salary and compensation. This can be especially true for clergypersons.

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THE CE INTERVIEW: Mark Mellen

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Mark Mellen was 26 years old and a homeless drug addict when God called him out of misery into a life of purpose. After finishing college with a degree in finance, he went to Bethel Seminary and graduated with a master’s of arts in theological studies.

The best learnings, however, came from ministry experiences and mentorship from church leaders who, Mellen says, “took a shot on me.”

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