leaders Archives - Church Executive


Charles Jenkins: transformational leader

At 24, Charles Jenkins took up the pastoral reins of Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church (Fellowship Chicago) following the retirement in December 2000 of its legendary founding pastor the Rev. Clay Evans, who served the church for 50 years.

Read More >
Share

Shaping culture

One of the growth lids most organizations hit is when their organizational culture is contrary to their organizational goals.

Read More >
Share

Collaborate don’t compete

All too often in our local churches when we are putting together agendas, looking to push into new frontiers, recruiting volunteers or putting together annual budgets, we tend to compete with each other.

Read More >
Share

Can churches grow in the summer?

Of course they can. In fact, churches should grow in the summer. However, they rarely do for one simple reason: their leaders let down too much.

Read More >
Share

Learn to speak well

Those who carry responsibilities in congregations

Read More >
Share

Being humble is one of the most critical traits of a great leader

When church administrators work at building their team or merely conduct a meeting they must “compel the process,” says management consultant

Patrick Lencioni, and when it doesn’t happen it is more often because “they have a misplaced sense of humility.”

Lencioni, president of The Table Group that specializes in organizational health and executive team development, is a favorite speaker at church conferences. He has authored nine books with more than three million copies sold, and the latest one is The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business (Jossey-Bass, 2012). Church Executive asked Lencioni to apply the advice in his book to pastors and executive pastors of churches as well as to companies: We don’t hear much about humility in business? Being humble is one of the most critical things a great leader must be. But being humble means that leaders know that they are not more important than the people they lead. They are servant leaders. However, even servant leaders need to understand that their words and actions are, in fact, more impactful than those of others.

Read More >
Share

Church recovery programs are a safe place for personal growth

Look at your church’s weekend bulletin and you will likely see six, eight, maybe 10 “recovery programs” available, in what may seem more like a clinic than a church, where more is being said about therapy than salvation. But not so, says Liz Swanson and Teresa McBean, authors of a review of such programs in the book Bridges to Grace (Zondervan, 2011). “Recovery programs are absolutely not therapeutically focused,” McBean says. “They are, indeed, often times more about salvation than some of the other areas of the church. A recovery group does not advise, it provides a place for safe storytelling, connecting, and introduction to God. People talk about how God has helped them, and it encourages others. Therapy doesn’t work with recovery — only God can heal these wounds.”

Read More >
Share

Lead during conflict

Every position of leadership has its nuances. We pastors are no different.

Read More >
Share

Who says small, rural churches can’t grow? Not Shannon O’Dell

Ever tempted to think “we’re just a country church of 30 souls, we’ll never grow much larger”? Or you’ve thought, “There’s no way we will ever see our church at 3,000 people.” Don’t tell that to Shannon O’Dell, senior pastor of Brand New Church in the small, rural church of Bergman, AR. O’Dell tells about his experience of raising up a church of 30 to 3,000 over just six years in Transforming Church in Rural America: Breaking All the Rurals (New Leaf Press, 2010). He talks about “the rules” about the rurals — “the unspoken but clearly understood values that permeate American Christianity’s beliefs about churches in the boonies.” Bottom line, he says, is “forget the rules.”

Church Executive shared some questions with Pastor O’Dell:

Describe the area in which the church is located; what is “rural” about the area? Bergman, AR, population 407, just got a Dollar General! There are no major employers in this town, but a great school and wonderful people. The Klu Klux Klan is headquartered just a few miles from our campus, but has no impact on slowing down the love of God to every race in our community.

Read More >
Share

The Amiable Autocrat

Nice dictators exist, at least in the leadership sense. I refer to these types

Read More >
Share